Cuisine Of Rajasthan

f07f66373f19cf5cc89f8da6b57b201cThe Mughal style did influence the royal Rajput kitchens of the past yet the common man’s fare remained untouched. The royals ate off gold, the nobles used silver, and all others were entitled to bronze.
The large part of the Rajasthan food is vegetarian. The daily countryside
fare consists of a vegetable dish made from desert beans like gwarphali, mogri, sangri or desert fruits like kair and kachri, bread of millet, barley, maize or wheat and sour buttermilk. Yoghurt cooked using onions, garlic, mustard, red chilli powder and other spices will substitute the vegetable dish especially in summer.


The specialities include Gatte-keSubzi – chickpea flour paste rolled into a sausage shape, cut into slices and cooked in yoghurt mixed witli onions, garlic and spices and Badika-Saag-dried moth lentil dumplings cooked similarly. Papads andbhujiyas (moth lentil snack) are also gravied in Rajasthan. Karhi or Khatta is the accompaniment common to almost all regions. Made using sour buttermilk, it is mixed with chickpea flour and allowed to cook with crushed garlic cloves and mustard seeds.

The Mughal style did influence the royal Rajput kitchens of the past yet the common man’s fare remained untouched. The royals ate off gold, the nobles used silver, and all others were entitled to bronze.

The large part of the Rajasthan food is vegetarian. The daily countryside fare consists of a vegetable dish made from desert beans like gwarphali, mogri, sangri or desert fruits like kair and kachri, bread of millet, barley, maize or wheat and sour buttermilk. Yoghurt cooked using onions, garlic, mustard, red chilli powder and other spices will substitute the vegetable dish especially in summer.

The specialities include Gatte-keSubzi – chickpea flour paste rolled into a sausage shape, cut into slices and cooked in yoghurt mixed witli onions, garlic and spices and Badika-Saag-dried moth lentil dumplings cooked similarly. Papads andbhujiyas (moth lentil snack) are also gravied in Rajasthan. Karhi or Khatta is the accompaniment common to almost all regions. Made using sour buttermilk, it is mixed with chickpea flour and allowed to cook with crushed garlic cloves and mustard seeds.

Daal Bati Choorma
The most popular Rajasthan food is the paal, Bati and Choorma. Bati is a round
I ball of generally wheat bread baked in a charcoal fire and soaked in a generous amount of ghee. Another variety masala bati is wheat bati stuffed with spices, mawa, peas and dry fruits. The bread of bati can also be made from maize or millet. The Daal is lentil curry fried in clarified ghee using onions, garlic and spices. Choorma is a sweet dish made of gram flour bruised with jaggery or sugar, ghee, cardamom and dried fruits.

Roti -unleavened bread made of barley, millet or wheat. Kichara, a
porridge made using millet grains and moth lentil boiled together in water with a touch of ghee (clarified butter) and little spices is farmer’s mainstay eaten with jaggery.
Bajra (Barley) ki roti, eaten with chutney (paste) made of garlic and red chilli is another common accompaniment for the labour class people of Rajasthan. Rabri-millet whole grains cooked in buttermilk, an extremely soothing summer drink, is also a favourite. A typical Marwari community food will include Puri or Parantha, a sweet and sour tomato curry, Gatteki-Subzi, but more spicy and cooked in ghee. However, today the availability of vegetables even at remote places has led to the change in the local cuisine.

Rajasthan cooking has long been influenced by the war lifestyle of its Rajput inhabitants. The Rajput as a hunter-warrior would have boar, deer, duck, wild fowl and peacock as food.

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